Ugly Duckling Presse

Nets
Nets

Jen Bervin

Poetry | $14 $12
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"Jen Bervin has reimagined Shakespeare as our true contemporary." — Paul Auster"I stripped Shakespeare's sonnets bare to the 'nets' to make the space of the poems open, porous, possible—a divergent elsewhere. When we write poems, the history of poetry is with us, pre-inscribed in the white of the page; when we read or write poems, we do it with or against this palimpsest." —Jen Bervin.For a limited edition companion poem (letterpress printed, framed and signed) click here.

About the Author

Jen Bervin
Jen Bervin is a Brooklyn-based visual artist and writer whose works often combine text and textiles with strong conceptual elements and a minimalist’s eye for the poetic and essential. Her work has been exhibited internationally and is held in more than thirty collections, including The Walker Art Center and The J. Paul Getty Museum. She has published eight books, including Emily Dickinson: The Gorgeous Nothings, named a Best Book of the Year by Hyperallergic and The New Yorker. Jen Bervin’s work receives support from Creative Capital and the Rauschenberg Foundation and can be viewed on her website.

Advance Praise

"Jen Bervin has reimagined Shakespeare as our true contemporary. Her little poems sing." —Paul Auster
"Nets has the strange feel of verbal topography: the original sonnet text is a sort of plain that single, select words soar up from like jagged spires.” —Paul Collins, The Believer
"Bervin shows us ways in which we might open up pre- or over-determined uses of past structures without erasing them—making the poems all the more complex by their refusal to dislocate. Her Nets is context responsive and responsible, without the knot of lyric-envy and linguistic guilt of many contemporary poems that pillage the past for strangeness, or worse, for an energetic imagination that might impersonate the writer's." —Christine Hume, Aufgabe
"Bervin's text breaks the urns of the sonnets into their fragmented parts, thus rendering the ghostly whole wholly ghostly." —Philip Metres, Jacket