Ugly Duckling Presse

Night Palace
Night Palace

Micah Ballard & Julien Poirier, Eds.

Poetry
Out of Print
"A fascinating collection." — The Volta Blog

A compendium of poems edited by Julien Poirier and Micah Ballard. Published in conjunction with Auguste Press.

Featuring work by Kevin Opstedal, Patrick James Dunagan, John Wieners, Sunnylyn Thibodeaux, David Meltzer, Gerard de Nerval (trans. Robert Duncan), Darin Klein, Christina Fisher, Will Skinker, Duncan McNaughton, Will Yackulic, Micah Ballard, Cedar Sigo, Skip Fox, Stephanie Young, Ryan Newton, Robert Creeley, Cedar Sigo, Micah Ballard, David Larsen, Jeff Karl Butler, Tom Clark, Pierre Reverdy (trans. Kenneth Rexroth), Julien Poirier, and Joanne Kyger.

 

Excerpt ˇ

Excerpt

Directions to the Night Palace

Head west on Sunset and turn left at the whale skeleton. Keep driving until you get to a dirt road. Continue on for about a mile until you see the temple ruins then turn right. At the streetlight make another right and then a quick left. Go down about half a block. There's a pillar of flames out front. You can't miss it.

—From 'Turning Silver' by Kevin Opstedal

Close ˆ

About the Editor

Micah Ballard was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Recent books include Negative Capability in the Verse of John Wieners, Bettina Coffin, In the Kindness of Night, Scenes from the Saragossa Manuscript, Evangeline Downs (UDP 2006), and Parish Krewes.  He currently works for the MFA in Writing Program at USF. He is co-editor for Auguste Press and Lew Gallery Editions. Julien Poirier helped start the Ugly Duckling Presse Collective, where he edited New York Nights newspaper from 2001 to 2006. His first full-length book, El Golpe Chileño, was published by UDP in 2010.  Editorial projects include Jack Micheline’s One of a Kind (UDP 2008), Steve Dalachinsky’s In Glorious Black & White (UDP 2005), Stan Apps’s Soft Hands (UDP 2005), and Cedar Sigo’s Selected Writings (editions 1 and 2). He lives in Berkeley, CA, with his wife and daughter. 

Advance Praise

There are communal ghosts among the poems, haunting, existing as phantoms talking code through crows, barkeeps, dragons, moonlight, Count Dracula, Jimmy Hoffa and blood. They, like Count Dracula, welcome one into their universe only to be consumed by the vivid images and crisp distortion of social reality through the fantastical.—The Volta Blog