Dog Ear
Dog Ear

Erica Baum

Poetry/Art | $25 $20
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"a remote and contemplative observation of the world’s wild tumult" — The Forward

The concept of Dog Ear is simple and straightforward: dog-eared pages of mass-market paperbacks are photographed to isolate the small diagonally bisected squares or rectangles of text. The photographs are formally quite neutral and sedate—cursorily reminiscent of Alber's "Homage to the Square" series of prints, paintings and tapestries—but the text also demands attention and it is what allows or coaxes the viewer to linger. As Kenny Goldsmith says in his introduction: "The idea that there's no one correct way to engage with an artwork is at the heart of Erica Baum's Dog Ear series. Do we see them or do we read them? If we choose to read them, how should we read? Across the fold? Through it? Around it?  If we choose to look at Baum's pictures, how should we see them? As artistic photographs? Documentation? Text art?”

With essays by Kenneth Goldsmith and Béatrice Gross.

About the Author

Erica Baum
Erica Baum received a B.A. in Anthropology from Barnard College, Columbia University, and an M.F.A. in Photography from the Yale School of Art. She has exhibited in New York, Baltimore, San Francisco, Kansas City, Berlin (Germany), Italy, and Mälmo (Sweden). Her work was included in the book Vitamin Ph: New Perspectives in Photography (Phaidon Press, 2006). She was a 2008 fellow in Photography from the New York Foundation for the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions include Shuffled Glances at Bureau, NYC, and Erica Baum: The Public Imagination at Circuit in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Advance Praise

Her word play is at once both deeply contemporary and achingly nostalgic, a mourning for a more physical relationship to knowledge.—International Center of Photography
...proposes a divine (or poetic) perspective: a remote and contemplative observation of the world’s wild tumult.—The Forward
Dog Ear is a perfect book to learn how to find the fun in reading poems that ask the reader to work, poems that ask the reader to participate, engage, judge, decide, involve themselves.—A Public Face